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Zoom Zoom Magazine Issue 29

plush sedans, even a rotary-engined 26-seater bus, the Parkway. Rarely seen Mazda models — the little two-stroke-engined 1972 Chantez; a 1975 Mazda Roadpacer AP, a luxury sedan of which only 800 models were ever built; a cabriolet version of a 1987 323 Familia; a 1993 626 with four-wheel-steering; a tow-truck version of the 1974 REPU pickup — flank the marque’s more familiar legends, from the pioneering 1968 Cosmo Sport to the gorgeous 1992 RX-7 FD. This cornucopia is laced with a variety of memorabilia: from period advertising posters and watercolour sketches by former Mazda designer Mikio Nakajima, to a cutaway model of a rotary engine and die-cast scale models of Japanese police RX-7s. The café and shop also make for pleasant breaks, with the net result that, for the Mazda enthusiast travelling to or through southern Germany, it is hard to imagine a better waypoint to spend a day. As enjoyable as it is to experience this mother lode of precious metal, the complete picture emerges once you add the human element. The Freys are clearly as Mazda-mad as it can possibly get. MAZDA R130 COUPE Year: 1969 Engine: 2 x 655cc twin rotor Power: 126ps The Bertone-penned RX-87 entered production as the R130 Coupe. The Freys say it is one of their favourite cars, and one can see why. The head-turning lines, all sleek elegance and taut muscularity, are a winner. But it was its powerful twin-rotor engine, driving the front wheels and capable of delivering a 118mph top speed, which helped earn the R130 the name ‘the lord of the road’ in Japan.


Zoom Zoom Magazine Issue 29
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